Ostional

Montezuma

Camaronal

Bahia de los Piratas

Montezuma

Montezuma is our location for one of the Turtle Conservation Projects. We offer two turtle projects here – one is in a place called Refugio Romelia, a bit outside of Montezuma (30 minutes). It’s a more isolated but very beautiful project. Montezuma has another turtle conservation project right in town, but it’s often very busy. Hence we also send our volunteers to Refugio Romelia.

Montezuma is a very sweet town. It’s very small but has many tourists – backpackers and volunteers go there, so it’s always busy. There are several supermarkets and an atm as well so you can get everything you need there. There are lots of street venders with nice jewellery and souvenirs and surf shops as well.

Bahia de los Piratas

Bahia de los Piratas is home to the “Nombre del Jesus” turtle conservation project. The beach is very much “off the beaten path”, remotely located about 15 minutes from Playa Grande. The nearest (small) town of Matapalo is where volunteers get off the bus, and are picked up by a taxi to bring them to the project.

The name Bahia de los Piratas comes from the skull and crossbones flag flying in one of the signature rock islands just off shore. Activities that can be done at the beach include paddleboarding, kayaking, and snorkeling – the waters are crystal clear. And of course- it’s a prime spot to see sea turtles!

Camaronal

The Camaronal Wildlife Refuge is know for it’s surfing and fishing, but the site is perhaps best known for the important role it plays in the preservation of one of Costa Rica’s treasures, the sea turtle. The best time to view sea turtles at the Camaronal Wildlife Refuge is during Costa Rica’s rainy season, which runs from May through November.

To travel to this project site, you’ll have to go to Samara, and from there take private transport arranged by us.

 

Ostional

Ostional is the location of our Turtle Conservation Internship.

The Ostional Wildlife Refuge is a Wildlife Refuge was originally declared a protected area in 1982. It was created to protect important nesting beaches of the Olive Ridley Sea Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea).

The beach of Ostional is the scenery for a rarely-seen biological wonder. In rainy season, the week before new moon, hundreds – and sometimes hundreds of thousand sea turtles come to one specific mile of beach at Ostional to dig their eggs into the black, volcanic sand.

Only olive-ridleys and their close relatives, Kemp’s Sea Turtles, the latter an Atlantic species synchronize their nesting in mass emergences or “arribadas”, the Spanish word for arrivals.

Ostional is a very small and more remote town. There is not much going on there besides the turtles. There is a couple of small pulperias / supermarkets, and just a couple of sodas.